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Every Dragon Ball Kanji And What They Mean (Gi Symbols)

Every Dragon Ball Kanji And What They Mean (Gi Symbols) SUBSCRIBE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1eDKt0fHCjs : Dragon Ball Gi Symbols And Kanji Explained

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There are a lot of consistent elements in the world of Dragon Ball, from transformations to energy attacks with crazy names and lots of villains becoming good guys. Another consistent part of the franchise that perhaps some fans overlook is Kanji. Specifically, characters wearing outfits with kanji on them, be it of their own name, their teacher’s name or their family name.

The first kanji to be introduced was, strangely enough, Emperor Pilaf’s, since Goku’s signature orange gi would not come until the second saga of the series. After Pilaf, we were introduced to the kanji of Yamcha and Monster Carrot, both of whom came in the Pilaf Saga. Fast forward a bit and we were eventually introduced to the kanji of the turtle school, a symbol that Goku, Krillin and Yamcha would go on to wear for quite some time, brandishing the character at the World Martial Arts Tournament in the World Tournament saga.

Kanji are mostly used to show respect to one’s martial arts master, at least when it comes to the warriors of Earth, but regardless every kanji in the series has a meaning, meanings that not every fan may know. So, we decided to explain them all in this video, from the King Piccolo Saga to the Saiyan Saga. Which characters wear the same Kanji? Who goes around wearing clothes with their names on them? Check the video out to learn all about Dragon Ball Kanji and don’t forget to subscribe to CBR for more Dragon Ball videos. Thanks for watching!

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